Joli OS – first impressions

April 4, 2011

My oldish Acer Aspire One has been running Ubuntu Netbook Remix for a year or so, and I have become increasingly annoyed with how slow it is. I remember it as being much faster when I installed it, so either a) I have become faster, b) The performance of the installation has degraded, or c) My memory is incorrect yet again.

I’m actually inclined to go with b). The problem with the Aspire One (some models) is its extremely slow 8GB SSD. I know, those things are supposed to be fast, and they have done wonders for my last two laptops. But on the AA1, especially the write speed really is terrible. So I’m suspecting that something has caused the Ubuntu installation to do more writes over time…whether this is disk fragmentation, the browser cache or whatever, I don’t know.

For the reinstall, I decided to try out Joli OS and so far it looks like this was a good choice! What I basically need is for this machine to be 100% quiet, reasonably responsive and able to render web pages and PDF files. That’s all, because I use it almost exclusively for reading in bed.

The entire OS is built very much like I would expect Chrome OS (which I haven’t tried) to be built. Everything revolves around the web, and it seems that most of the OS is written in HTML5. Joli OS is in fact based on Ubuntu Netbook Remix, but simplified (even further) and integrating Jolicloud, which is pretty cool. In fact Jolicloud is at the core of the user experience where it replaces the launcher found in UNR.

The idea with Jolicloud is to have a web-based, portable desktop containing all the webapps that you use all the time. Facebook, Twitter, Gmail, Flickr, YouTube, just to name a few of the ones that are added by default.

I’m not sure exactly what Joli OS adds to this (because the OS is all I’ve tried), but a feature I found especially nice is the ability to link my device with Dropbox and Google Docs. I use Dropbox for storing a lot of PDF documents that I want to have available anywhere I go. But I also use it for lots of other purposes, and actually I think this is one of the reasons my UNR installation finally gave up – because I was naive enough to have Dropbox installed and syncing everything.

With Joli, I can browse my Dropbox and open individual documents. Browsing is of course slightly slower than on my physical disk, but I tend to keep these documents open for weeks, so this is not an issue. And of course I could just download any files I want to access offline.

So far, I have done very little customization of the OS. The AA1 has a very noisy fan, but fixing this problem with the acerhdf module is a  simple matter of editing a few files. I also want Caps Lock to be an additional Ctrl, and I want both Danish and US keyboard layouts installed. Both wishes were granted after a few minutes of poking around in the settings (these are just the Gnome settings, of course).

I’m really surprised to discover that I seem to fit exactly into the target group for an OS like this. I have installed Emacs (mostly to edit org files), but apart from that, it looks like I’ll be fine with the built-in selection of programs. Which is just Chromium and the Gnome stuff.

Finally, it looks like there’s a whole social networking thing built into Joli which I haven’t explored at all yet. But I have already earned the badge “Recycler” just by installing Joli and recycling a computer that was destined to be replaced by a tablet before long🙂

2 Responses to “Joli OS – first impressions”

  1. carl Says:

    So anything I can do on Ubuntu, I can generally do on Joli OS?

    I’m using fluxbox with Chrome as my only graphical app, aside from a Guake terminal I use for everything else. I’ve got Joli as my Chrome home page and everything works really well, but the Joli OS might be exactly what I need.

    I just wanted to be sure, I can drop to the command line on this OS and do regular BASH and Python stuff?

    • chopmo Says:

      I’m not sure, but I *think* that you can do Alt-F2 and launch eg. xterm or gnome-terminal. Unfortunately I can’t check right now, and it seems that the project is a little light on documentation.

      From your description I would think that Joli would be a very good fit for you, though, so maybe try to fire it up in a VirtualBox VM?


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